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The UI language
 ui:a
 ui:alist-value and ui:alist-item
 ui:application
 ui:button
 ui:checkbox
 ui:cond
 ui:context
 ui:default
 ui:dialog
 ui:dyn-enum-value and ui:dyn-enum-item
 ui:dynamic
 ui:encode
 ui:enum-value and ui:enum-item
 ui:enumerate
 ui:enumeration and ui:enum
 ui:false
 ui:file
 ui:form
 ui:if
 ui:ifexpr
 ui:iflang
 ui:ifvar
 ui:imagebutton
 ui:iter-*
 ui:iterate
 ui:page
 ui:param
 ui:popup
 ui:radio
 ui:richbutton
 ui:select
 ui:server-popup
 ui:special
 ui:string-value
 ui:template
 ui:text and ui:password
 ui:textarea
 ui:translate
 ui:true
 ui:use
 ui:variable
 t:*, q:*, and p:*
 l:*
 $param
 $[expr]
 Dot notation (v1.v2)
   
The dot notation

Variables can be declared with type dialog, and because of this it is possible that a dialog stores a subdialog in a variable. The question arises how you can access subdialogs like in:

<ui:dialog name="calling_dialog" start-page="...">
  ...
  <ui:variable name="v" .../>
  ...
  <ui:page name="calling_page">
    ...
    As in many other dialogs, you can now go to our
    <ui:a name="call_event">special dialog</ui:a>.
    ...
  </ui:page>
</ui:dialog>

<ui:dialog name="called_dialog" start-page="called_page">
  ...
  <ui:variable name="caller" type="dialog"/>
  ...
  <ui:page name="called_page">
    ...
    You can now do ... this ... and ... that.
    <ui:a name="return_event">Return to previous dialog.</ui:a>
    ...
  </ui:page>
</ui:dialog>

(See the section about Data types, it discusses the same example from another view.) Of course, when the calling dialog instantiates the called dialog, it stores itself into the dialog variable caller, so the previous dialog is preserved, and can be reactivated when the user wants to return. The variable caller is not only an abstract container for the original dialog, because it is possible to access the contents of the calling dialog from the called dialog by using the dot notation. For example, the variable v is available under the name caller.v, i.e. the name is prefixed by the name of the variable storing the dialog, separated by a dot. You can use the dot notation everywhere a variable is referenced, e.g.

<ui:dynamic variable="caller.v"/>
or just

${caller.v}
It is even possible to access variables from O'Caml (or Perl) by the dot notation:

let v = dlg # string_variable "caller.v" in
...
Note that a dialog variable is either empty (or None in O'Caml), or filled (Some dlg in O'Caml). Because of this, the "dot" access can cause an error condition when the dialog variable is empty.
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